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terça-feira, 27 de dezembro de 2011

Countdown to UFC 141 Full Video for "Lesnar vs. Overeem" - MMAFrenzy.com

Countdown to UFC 141 Full Video for "Lesnar vs. Overeem" - MMAFrenzy.com

MBA para quê?

MBA para quê?

Hack Your Productivity: A Time-Management Geek's 10-Minute Solution

FC Expert Blog
Hack Your Productivity: A Time-Management Geek's 10-Minute Solution
BY FC EXPERT BLOGGER KAIHAN KRIPPENDORFFThu Dec 22, 2011
This blog is written by a member of our expert blogging community and expresses that expert's views alone.


I just had the most productive week ever. I am a bit of a time-management geek. I’ve met and interviewed some amazing entrepreneurs, CEOs, and politicians. They all have one thing in common: They achieve more in less time than the rest of us. They each follow their own system, and I’ve tried some version of every one.
But two weeks ago I tried something new. And with the early results in, it’s the clear winner. If you want to rip out of the gates in 2012 on fire, give this method a shot. It will take just 10 minutes a day.
First, let me tell you what it’s not. This is not a visioning method. In other words, this method does not imply that by envisioning an outcome--a new job, a successful fundraising meeting, winning a sale--you will realize the outcome. My first roommate, and first officemate when I joined McKinsey, was the coach of the U.S. National Rugby Team in a prior life. He shared with me that he, and many elite athletes, envision a game in minute detail before they get on the field. But just envisioning victory is not enough. You have to get on the field. This simple process stimulates both--the vision and turf, the dream and the action.
This also is not a checklist. I tried detailed checklists for a while. I brainstormed what I had to do to achieve my outcome, wrote down all the to-dos, scheduled them into my calendar, and then knocked them off one by one: work out, read the newspaper, write my dissertation. While such rigid processes can keep you on track, they also reduce your flexibility to pounce on unexpected opportunities as they appear.
And you simply cannot predict these unexpected opportunities. It reminds me of the joke that perhaps only the economists among us will laugh at. An economics professor and student are walking through campus discussing the “efficient market hypothesis.” They see a $100 bill lying on the floor. The student bends down to pick it up but the professor says, “Don’t bother. If that were a real bill it wouldn’t be there.” Along our paths we will come across unexpected opportunities, things we could never have planned for.
So what we need is both: the vision and the action. Here is my discovery. I put it together after a coaching session, reading a book on goal setting, and having 15 hours on a plane to think it through. It worked for me; perhaps it will work for you.
1. Take out a sheet of paper. 
2. Split it into six columns.
3. Title those columns “Initiatives,” “Q1,” “Q2,” “Q3,” “Q4,” and “Dec. 31, 2012” (“Q” stands for quarter, or a three-month period).
4. Under the “Initiatives” column, list the 3 to 7 initiatives or areas you will focus on next year. I wrote “Speaking,” “Consulting,” “Training,” “Fund,” “Media,” and “PhD.” These are the six areas of my career.
5. Starting with the last column, “Dec. 31, 2012,” fill in 1 to 3 outcomes you want to achieve for each initiative by the end of the year. Ask yourself, “What do I want to be true?” For example, for “Speaking,” I wrote my target keynote speaking fee and the number of speeches I want to give in 2012. For “Media,” I wrote that I want to launch my own TV show.
6. Fill in the matrix. Work backward from your year-end desired outcomes and fill in what must be true in each prior quarter. For example, if I want my speaking fee to be X, I need it to be at 80% of that the quarter before.
7. Every morning invest 10 minutes envisioning. Pull out your matrix and imagine quarter by quarter realizing your goals and see how that builds up to realizing your year-end vision. Think about what it would look and feel like to have achieved or exceeded your goals across each row. Thomas Edison supposedly did something similar, thinking about what it would feel like to have found a solution. Being attached to the feeling of victory makes you want it; wanting it makes you take the action and see the opportunities to realize it.
I created a simple strategy tracking tool, which you can find on the tools page of my website (kaihan.net).
I did this for two weeks and amazing things started happening. Because I was investing my time in the most strategically important things and ignoring the rest, I had my most productive week ever. My PhD thesis was accepted by my advisors, a key partnership to license my IP is now close to being signed, I booked two national TV appearances, the documentation for my new fund was completed and, on the personal side, I repaired our basement heating, replaced missing light bulbs, and brought my kids in for their dental checkups.
Even more important were the advances that were not on my to-do list. For example, a huge new potential partner I never contemplated appeared. And because I could recognize how this opportunity fit into my overall strategy, I could jump on it even though it was not on my “to do” list.
The daily “meditation” clears your mind, pulls you above the trees, and reconnects you with what you are building (your long-term vision). Now, imagine if you did that every day in 2012. Imagine if every week were your best week ever.
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[Image: Flickr user padraic woods]

How Bad Plans And "Good Ideas" Ruin Meetings

How Bad Plans And "Good Ideas" Ruin Meetings
BY DAVID ALLENTue Nov 1, 2011
Does your company plan things correctly? Or are meetings unproductive due to poor planning? We continue our Leadership Hall of Fame series, a year-long look at the top business books and authors, with an excerpt from Getting Things Done (2001) by David Allen.
You're already familiar with the most brilliant and creative planner in the world: your brain. You yourself are actually a planning machine. You're planning when you get dressed, eat lunch, go to the store, or simply talk. Although the process may seem somewhat random, a quite complex series of steps in fact has to occur before your brain can make anything happen physically. Your mind goes through five steps to accomplish virtually any task.
1. Defining purpose and principles
2. Outcome visioning
3. Brainstorming
4. Organizing
5. Identifying next actions
But is the process describe above the way your committee is planning the church retreat? Is it how your IT team is approaching the new system installation? Is it how you're organizing the wedding or thinking through the potential merger? If you're like most people I interact with in a coaching or consulting capacity, the collective answer to these questions is probably not.
When the "Good Idea" Is a Bad Idea
Have you ever hear a well-intentioned manager start a meeting with the question, "OK, so who's got a good idea about this?"
What is the assumption here? Before any evaluation of what's a "good idea" can be trusted, the purpose must be clear, the vision must be well defined, and all the relevant data must have been collected (brainstormed) and analyzed (organized). "What's a good idea?" is a good question, but only when you're about 80 percent of the way through your thinking! Starting there would probably blow anyone's creative mental fuses.
Trying to approach any situation from a perspective that is not the natural way your mind operates will be difficult. People do it all the time, but it almost always engenders a lack of clarity and increased stress. In interactions with others, it opens the doors for egos, politics, and hidden agendas to take over the discussion (generally speaking, the most verbally aggressive will run the show). And if it's just you, attempting to come up with a "good idea" before defining your purpose, creating a vision, and collecting lots of initial bad ideas is likely to give you a case of creative constipation.
Let's Blame Mrs. Williams
If you're like most people in our culture, the only formal training you've ever had in planning and organizing proactively was in the fourth or fifth grade. And even if that wasn't the only education you've had in this area, it was probably the most emotionally intense (meaning it sank in the deepest).
Mrs. Williams, my fourth-grade teacher, had to teach us about organizing our thinking (it was in her lesson plans). We were going to learn to write reports. But in order to write a well-organized, successful report, what did we have to write first? That's right--an outline!
Did you ever have to do that, create an outline to begin with? Did you ever stare at a Roman numeral I at the top of your page for a torturous period of time and decide that planning and organizing ahead of time were for people very different from you? Probably.
In the end, I did learn to write outlines. I just wrote the report first, then made up an outline from the report, after the fact.
That's what most people learned about planning from our educational system. And I still see outlines done after the fact, just to please the authorities. In the business world, they're often headed "Goals" and "Objectives." But they still have very little to do with what people are doing or what they're inspired about. These documents are sitting in drawers and in e-mails somewhere, bearing little relationship to operational reality.
The Reactive Planning Model
The unnatural planning model is what most people unconsciously think of as "planning," and because it's so often artificial and irrelevant to real work, people just don't plan. At least not on the front end: they resist planning meetings, presentations, and strategic operations until the last minute.
But what happens if you don't plan ahead of time? In many cases, crisis! ("Didn't you get the tickets? I thought you were going to do that?!" Then, when the urgency of the last minute is upon you, the reactive planning model ensues.
What's the first level of focus when the stuff hits the fan? Action! Work harder! Overtime! More people! Get busier! And a lot of stressed-out people are thrown at the situation.
Then, when having a lot of busy people banging into each other doesn't resolve the situation, someone gets more sophisticated and says, "We need to get organized!" (Catching on now?) Then people draw boxes around the problem and label them. Or redraw the boxes and relabel them.
At some point they realize that just redrawing boxes isn't really doing much to solve the problem. Now someone (much more sophisticated) suggests that more creativity is needed. "Let's brainstorm!" With everyone in the room, the boss asks, "So who's got a good idea here?" (Thank you, Mrs. Williams.)
When not much happens, the boss may surmise that his staff has used up most of its internal creativity. Time to hire a consultant! Of course, if the consultant is worth his salt, at some point he is probably going to ask the big question: "So, what are you trying to do here, anyway?"
The reactive style is the reverse of the natural model. It will always come back to a top-down focus. It's not a matter of whether the natural planning will be done--just when, and at what cost.