Total de visualizações de página

segunda-feira, 2 de janeiro de 2012

Video HSM Inovação - Paradigmas

Na HSM ExpoManagement 2011, os participantes tiveram a oportunidade de assitir a palestras na Estação do Conhecimento Inovação. Carlos Bremer, diretor de Inovação da Axia Value Chain, falou sobre "Inovando Paradigmas: Pensando diferente e transformando resultados".

Video HSM Atelier de Líderes - Empresas de Alta Tecnologia

O Atelier de Líderes, Estação do Conhecimento na HSM ExpoManagement 2011, falou sobre os desafios da liderança. Nesta palestra, Mario Anseloni, da Itautec, fala sobre esses desafios em empresas de alta tecnologia. Debate conduzido por Cesar Souza (Empreenda) e André Camargo (BrasilPrev).

BLOG-DISCOVERY

Shane Snow is a New York-based tech jour­nal­ist and co-founder of Contently.com, a mar­ket­place for brand pub­lish­ers and jour­nal­ists.


BLOG-DISCOVERY

In 2010, New York City start­up, Birch­box launched a blog about beau­ty prod­ucts before it had any cus­tomers. The beau­ty sam­ple deliv­ery ser­vice – and its blog – explod­ed in pop­u­lar­i­ty.
Today, to keep up with its read­ers’ appetite for con­tent, Birch­box employs mul­ti­ple edi­tors and pub­lish­es half a dozen posts a day, along with an online mag­a­zine. Accord­ing to compete.com, Birchbox.com traf­fic grew 6,500% in 2011, to over 110,000 month­ly unique vis­i­tors at last count.

But raw traf­fic data doesn’t tell the whole story about the value of a pub­li­ca­tion. Birch­box’s blog dri­ves cus­tomer acqui­si­tion and reten­tion, which means its read­ers are loyal enough to become sub­scribers, fol­low­ers and cus­tomers. At last count, the com­pa­ny had 44,000 Face­book Likes, 14,000 Twit­ter fol­low­ers, and 9,400 Youtube sub­scribers. New blog sub­scribers – peo­ple who had will­ing­ly opted in to Birch­box con­tent – pile on every month. (The com­pa­ny declined to release hard num­bers on total blog sub­scribers).

Iron­i­cal­ly, the hit-based nature of social media means many blog own­ers have dif­fi­cul­ty cul­ti­vat­ing long-term loy­al­ty from their users. It’s easy to get excit­ed when the occa­sion­al “viral” post brings in a spike of traf­fic. But often that traf­fic melts away as quick­ly as it arrived.

Brian Clark, CEO of Copy­Blog­ger Media, says a build­ing a qual­i­ty blog fol­low­ing means “attract­ing the right peo­ple in order to accom­plish your spe­cif­ic goals.” In other words, he says, “you’ve got to put qual­i­ty ahead of quantity.”

So, how do upstart blogs like Birch­box’s build such vora­cious fol­low­ings? Here are six tips to attract­ing read­ers who stick around longer than the click of a Stum­ble­Upon but­ton:

1. Turn Exist­ing Cus­tomers Into Read­ers
Cur­rent cus­tomers can be an excel­lent source of qual­i­ty read­ers for a new pub­li­ca­tion. Often, they already iden­ti­fy with the tar­get demo­graph­ic. And they’re already famil­iar with you.

Whether it’s get­ting a cus­tomer to sub­scribe to a newslet­ter, blog, or Twit­ter feed dur­ing a signup or check­out process, or request­ing they sub­scribe in a follow-up email or call, happy cus­tomers are high­ly like­ly to become read­ers. Turn­ing cus­tomers into read­ers gives you the oppor­tu­ni­ty to reach other poten­tial cus­tomers – your read­ers’ friends – through social media.

Birch­box ben­e­fits from this vir­tu­ous cycle as new read­ers become cus­tomers, new cus­tomers become read­ers, and read­ers share with friends.

2. Skip The Mis­lead­ing Traffic-Boosting Tech­niques
Pageview-racking slideshows and catchy-yet-misleading head­lines are com­mon­place in the blo­gos­phere; many pub­li­ca­tions use them to increase traf­fic (and there­fore adver­tis­ing rev­enue). Unfor­tu­nate­ly, how­ev­er, these tech­niques often don’t result in qual­i­ty read­er­ship growth.

“Head­lines should be descrip­tive and tell read­ers what to expect,” says Chris Spag­n­uo­lo, Founder and Pub­lish­er of guyism.com, an inde­pen­dent men’s lifestyle site with 3.5 mil­lion month­ly unique vis­i­tors.

Slideshows skew page views-per visit stats, mak­ing it more dif­fi­cult to accu­rate­ly gauge traf­fic stick­i­ness; mis­lead­ing head­lines may put your con­tent in front of new, unsus­pect­ing read­ers, but those read­ers are less like­ly to stay, and may even have neg­a­tive reac­tions to being tricked.

“We’ve always believed that the best way to get good qual­i­ty read­ers is to cre­ate good qual­i­ty content,” says Ben Lerer, Co-Founder of men’s city guide Thril­list. Lerer says Thril­list’s exper­i­ments with slideshows or tricky head­lines never yield­ed valu­able read­er growth.

3. Speak to a Very Spe­cif­ic Audi­ence
Cast­ing a wide net can be good for gen­er­at­ing traf­fic, but with a glut of read­ing options on the web, pas­sion­ate blog fol­low­ers grav­i­tate toward hyper-specific pub­li­ca­tions. That’s one of the rea­sons many niche media sites are grow­ing while main­stream pub­li­ca­tions bleed read­ers.

Thril­list ben­e­fits from tar­get­ing a niche audi­ence, Lerer says, rather than broad cat­e­gories like “New York­ers” or “men.” The pub­li­ca­tion focus­es on 20- and 30-some­thing, nightlife-loving urban males, and it speaks to them as peers. Know­ing its read­ers com­plete­ly allows Thril­list to con­nect with them more effec­tive­ly.

Often this means tar­get­ing a niche in which you – the blog­ger – already belong. “We [are] real­ly writ­ing for ourselves,” Chen explains. “And we never talk down to our readers.”

4. Guest Post and Use Guest Blog­gers
Allow­ing guest blog­gers to post on your blog brings twofold ben­e­fits: more con­tent for your blog, and new read­er expo­sure for your site. Guest blog­gers often point their own fol­low­ers to posts they’ve writ­ten for other pub­li­ca­tions (and you should encour­age them to do so). Ide­al­ly, those read­ers start to rec­og­nize your blog and even­tu­al­ly sub­scribe to you, too.

“Our uniques have increased every month, in large part because we’ve been … using more guest bloggers,” Chen explains.

Like­wise, guest post­ing your own con­tent on rel­e­vant blogs in your niche can help you attract new audi­ences.

“We’ve built a num­ber of valu­able part­ner­ships with brands and other pub­lish­ers who have helped us edu­cate other guys about Thrillist,” Lerer says. “But,” he adds, “we know these guys wouldn’t stick around if the qual­i­ty of what we pro­duced on a daily basis wasn’t top notch.”

5. Encour­age Loy­al­ty Through Con­sis­ten­cy
Giv­ing read­ers some­thing to expect helps them work your blog into their daily or week­ly rou­tine. As your audi­ence grows, you should increase your con­tent fre­quen­cy; how­ev­er, from the begin­ning, pub­lish­ing on a con­sis­tent sched­ule will help build loy­al­ty.

“We try to post between 6-10 times a day … to keep peo­ple com­ing back,” Chen says.

Con­sis­ten­cy also has to do with pre­sent­ing read­ers with a uni­fied voice or con­sis­tent approach­es. Clark says fos­ter­ing a qual­i­ty audi­ence means, “tak­ing an edi­to­r­i­al stand for what you believe in, rather than water­ing things down to avoid offend­ing any­one. This doesn’t nec­es­sar­i­ly mean you have to try to be con­tro­ver­sial. In this day and age, sim­ply tak­ing a posi­tion and stand­ing behind it will bring peo­ple who agree, and peo­ple who don’t.”

Clark con­tin­ues, “Don’t be afraid of those who don’t [agree with you]. They gal­va­nize your sup­port­ers who do agree, which turns them into fans instead of luke-warm traffic.”

6. Be Time­ly And Rel­e­vant
Blog to con­nect with what’s cur­rent­ly on your read­ers’ minds. This way, you’ll not be inter­rupt­ing them; instead, you’ll enhance their rou­tines.

“Be rel­e­vant, inter­est­ing, and digestible,” Chen says. “By giv­ing peo­ple sto­ries that are easy to click and share … you’ll instant­ly increase your reach.”

It’s all about social rel­e­vance, Spag­n­uo­lo says. “Think, ‘Will one of my friends from high school think this is worth shar­ing on Face­book?’ If the answer is yes, that’s a good start.”

Shares, fol­low­ers, bounce rates, and con­ver­sions can indi­cate whether a blog’s read­er­ship is engaged or sim­ply tran­sient. Any blog that’s tuned in to its audi­ence can increase the above and grow loyal read­ers.

“To us, a qual­i­ty read­er is some­one who stays or shares,” Lerer says. “If they’re engaged, they’ll be more like­ly to come back. If they’re shar­ing, they’re cre­at­ing value. Either way, those are the two best kinds of readers.”

Productivity Secrets of a Very Busy Man - HBR IdeaCast - Harvard Business Review

Productivity Secrets of a Very Busy Man - HBR IdeaCast - Harvard Business Review

How to Accomplish More by Doing Less - Tony Schwartz - Harvard Business Review

How to Accomplish More by Doing Less - Tony Schwartz - Harvard Business Review

Why I Hire People Who Fail - Jeff Stibel - Harvard Business Review

Why I Hire People Who Fail - Jeff Stibel - Harvard Business Review

Networking for Survival - Deborah Mills-Scofield - Harvard Business Review

Networking for Survival - Deborah Mills-Scofield - Harvard Business Review

How to Hang On to Your High Potentials - Harvard Business Review

How to Hang On to Your High Potentials - Harvard Business Review

The Future of Shopping - Harvard Business Review

The Future of Shopping - Harvard Business Review

Making Yourself Indispensable - Harvard Business Review

Making Yourself Indispensable - Harvard Business Review

The Economics of Well-Being - Harvard Business Review

The Economics of Well-Being - Harvard Business Review

Your Use of Pronouns Reveals Your Personality - Harvard Business Review

Your Use of Pronouns Reveals Your Personality - Harvard Business Review

How Will You Measure Your Life? - Harvard Business Review

How Will You Measure Your Life? - Harvard Business Review

Six Social Media Trends for 2012 - David Armano - Harvard Business Review

Six Social Media Trends for 2012 - David Armano - Harvard Business Review

Nine Things Successful People Do Differently - Heidi Grant Halvorson - Harvard Business Review

Nine Things Successful People Do Differently - Heidi Grant Halvorson - Harvard Business Review

Mastering the Art of Living Meaningfully Well - Umair Haque - Harvard Business Review

Mastering the Art of Living Meaningfully Well - Umair Haque - Harvard Business Review

Five Resolutions for Aspiring Leaders - John Coleman and Bill George - Harvard Business Review

Five Resolutions for Aspiring Leaders - John Coleman and Bill George - Harvard Business Review

Five Things You Should Stop Doing in 2012 - Dorie Clark - Harvard Business Review

Five Things You Should Stop Doing in 2012 - Dorie Clark - Harvard Business Review

8 previsões tecnológicas para 2012 O Tecmundo dá uma espiada no futuro e traz as novidades mais importantes que vão acontecer ainda neste ano.

O ano de 2011 foi ótimo no ramo da tecnologia, tanto para o Brasil quanto para o mundo. Mas isso já é passado: 2012 chegou, prometendo ainda mais novidades. Confira alguns dos fatos que devem acontecer antes que o ano (ou o mundo, para alguns) se acabe.

1- 1ª Guerra mundial das gigantes tecnológicas
Foi-se o tempo em que as companhias de tecnologia eram focadas em apenas uma área. A Google, por exemplo, deixou de ser conhecida apenas por sua ferramenta de busca para dominar o serviço de vídeos, além de atacar o Facebook diretamente com sua própria rede social e comprar a Motorola Mobility para poder competir com a Apple.

Mas suas rivais não ficaram paradas: cada uma está crescendo em novas áreas, que as colocam ainda mais próximas de uma batalha direta pelo controle do mercado. A maçã, por exemplo, está desenvolvendo um televisor para ocupar o espaço que a Google falhou com sua TV.

Na velocidade que esse crescimento ocorre, é provável que 2012 seja o ano de início da grande “guerra” entre Google, Apple e Facebook, já que quase não há mais espaço no mercado para que elas sigam sem se enfrentar. O resultado dessa briga deve literalmente definir o futuro da tecnologia, de acordo com o vencedor, já que ele passará a ter um monopólio de boa parte do mercado.

2- A queda dos antigos gigantes
Da mesma forma que estamos muito perto da guerra entre Google, Apple e Facebook, outras companhias que não têm força para bater de frente com os líderes do mercado estão cada vez mais perto de seu fim.

Mesmo antes da guerra começar, já é possível ver algumas empresas mostrando sinais de que têm seus dias contados, como é o caso da Nokia. Antes uma referência de qualidade no mercado de smartphones, a chegada do iPhone e do sistema Android colocou a finlandesa em uma situação apertada.

Até mesmo algumas das empresas que jamais esperamos ver na pior estão com problemas: tanto Sony quanto Microsoft perdem espaço para a Apple a cada dia que passa, principalmente no ramo de portáteis, onde os iPods, iPads e iPhones dominam.

Isso não quer dizer que este será o ano em que elas vão desaparecer por completo. Na verdade, muitas delas devem demorar vários anos para que isso aconteça, mas é provável que alguns nomes importantes ainda acabem sumindo do mapa até o fim de 2012.

3- Brasil finalmente no mapa
Por maior que seja nosso país, quando o assunto é tecnologia parece que, aos olhos das grandes empresas de fora, somos apenas um grão de areia que não merece atenção. Mas isso está cada vez mais perto de mudar.

O fim de 2011 marcou a chegada de várias companhias internacionais ao nosso mercado. A Apple, por exemplo, teve seus primeiros produtos fabricados no país e trouxe até mesmo a iTunes Store. Mas o melhor ficou para o público gamer, já que a Nintendo, Sony e Microsoft trouxeram versões tupiniquins de seus aparelhos e jogos, com direito a conteúdo exclusivo.

Se 2011 mostrou um futuro promissor para o Brasil, em 2012 devemos definitivamente entrar para o mapa, uma vez que não são poucas as empresas que já tem planos de criar sedes por aqui. Isso também deve fazer com que outras companhias queiram seguir suas concorrentes, para “tirar uma fatia do bolo” enquanto há tempo.

4- Facebook, dominando o Brasil desde 2011


Não é novidade dizer que o Facebook já venceu a guerra das redes sociais, deixando concorrentes como o Orkut e o Google+ comendo poeira. E ao que tudo indica, ele não deve parar por aí.

Seu sucesso na área de games é assustador (sendo praticamente a criadora dos jogos sociais), enquanto que os aplicativos que ele disponibiliza estão tomando um espaço cada vez maior no mercado. Se isso tudo já está acontecendo em 2011, o que esperar para o próximo ano? De forma simples, uma expansão assustadoramente maior.

Isso também significa que outros softwares devem perder cada vez mais espaço no mercado. E não estamos falando apenas dos menos conhecidos, mas também de gigantes como o MSN Messenger, um dos softwares mais utilizados pelos brasileiros: um programa de mensagens instantâneas do Facebook já está em fase de testes e promete tirar o aplicativo da Microsoft de seu trono.

5- Saem os dumbphones, entram os smartphones


Alguns anos atrás, a oportunidade de ter um smartphone era para poucos: o preço de um aparelho desses era salgado, além de normalmente obrigar o comprador a gastar mais rios de dinheiro com planos os das operadoras. Mas assim como foi com os notebooks nos últimos tempos, os celulares estão cada vez mais baratos.

O que antes chegava a custar mais de 2 mil reais, mesmo para o smartphone mais simples, agora podem ser encontrados por R$ 600,00 (um valor ainda alto, mas muito mais em conta) e ainda ter tudo que você esperaria em um bom celular.

Outro fator importante que aponta cada vez mais para o fim dos dumbphones está no nível de integração que atingimos com os gadgets e a internet. Atualmente, precisamos tanto dessas duas por perto que não é difícil imaginar alguém entrando em pânico por estar separado de sua conta de Facebook por muito tempo; algo facilmente remediável com um smartphone e uma conexão 3G.

6- Ultrabooks vs tablets
Outra guerra que deve começar em 2012 será para decidir quem ficará com o público que havia apostado nos netbooks – laptops com tela de 10’’ ou menos – e agora foge deles desde a chegada de dois novos “competidores”.

De um lado, temos os já conhecidos tablets, atualmente dominando o mercado de computadores portáteis com suas telas sensíveis e facilidade de uso. Do outro, temos os ultrabooks, a maior promessa da indústria, unindo configurações poderosas a um design ultrafino. Agora, resta saber qual dos dois será o vencedor.

7- Mais celulares que computadores


De que adianta ter um computador ou notebook se um bom smartphone custa menos, é mais fácil de carregar e consegue fazer quase tudo que eles? Esse é o motivo que leva muitas pessoas a comprarem um celular, no lugar de um PC.

E acredite, são muitos aqueles que pensam assim: de acordo com o site do The Washington Post, em 2012 o número de vendas de smartphones deve ultrapassar o dos computadores e notebooks juntos, com mais de 450 milhões de unidades vendidas. Esses valores devem aumentar ainda mais até 2013, quando há previsão de chegarem a 650 milhões.

8- Acabaram os IPs?
O que era originalmente previsto para 2010 está cada vez mais perto de acontecer: não haverá mais endereços de IP livres até o fim desse ano, o que vai obrigar a reestruturação de toda a rede do padrão IPv4 (usado atualmente) para o IPv6, se quisermos que a internet possa continuar crescendo.

Essa troca deverá levar anos, mas provavelmente será a última que precisará ser feita em muito tempo, pois o novo IPv6 gera um número de IPs praticamente infinito, comparado ao que temos agora.



Leia mais em: http://www.tecmundo.com.br/tecnologia/17119-8-previsoes-tecnologicas-para-2012.htm#ixzz1iLK1shWY